Administrative Histories M-O

This list of Administrative Histories briefly chronicles the history and changes within agencies, boards and commissions of the Arizona state government.

Each administrative history includes:

  • The legal authority
  • Function
  • History
  • Sources where this information was located

For more information on Arizona state government history or on the entries in this collection, contact research@azlibrary.gov, or 602-926-3870.

List Provided by:

The State Library of Arizona
ARIZONA STATE LIBRARY, ARCHIVES AND PUBLIC RECORDS
A Division of the Arizona Secretary of State
Holly Henley, State Librarian

Agency Histories M-O (as of September 02, 2016)

M N O
Medical Radiologic Technical Board of Examiners (MRTBE) Naturopathic Physicians Medical Board, State of Arizona Oil and Gas Conservation Commission
Arizona Navigable Stream Adjudication Commission (ANSAC) Ombudsman Citizens-Aide, Office of
Osteopathic Examiners in Medicine and Surgery, Arizona Board of
Arizona Outdoor Recreation Coordinating Commission (AORCC)

Agencies by Title

A-C D-F G-I J-L
M-O P-R S-U V-X

Medical Radiologic Technical Board of Examiners (MRTBE)

(See also Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency)

Authority

The Medical Radiologic Technical Board of Examiners (MRTBE) was established by Laws 1977, Chapter 145. Statutory authority is found at A.R.S. §§ 32-2801 et seq.

Function

The Medical Radiologic Technical Board of Examiners (MRTBE) is one of six divisions under the Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency (ARRA). ARRA is responsible for protecting public health and safety by regulating, inspecting and licensing the use and sources of radiation statewide. For more information on the functions and history of ARRA, refer to the ARRA history contained within this compilation.

MRTBE was established to protect people from excessive and improper exposure to medically applied ionizing radiation. MRTBE has statewide authority for licensing professionals practicing in various specialties of medical imaging and therapy using ionizing radiation. This includes x-ray machines, nuclear medicine, and mammography. MRTBE also investigates complaints against licensees; conducts administrative adjudication; provides information to the public; determines standards for approving schools of radiologic technology in Arizona; designs and administers certification examinations.

The director of ARRA serves as the MRTBE’s chair, along with ten other Board members, appointed by the Governor. The other Board members must include four practicing radiologic technologists, two public members, two licensed practitioners, one practical technologist in radiology, and one practicing nuclear medicine technologist.

History

Created by Laws 1964, Chapter 30, the precursor to ARRA was known as the Arizona Atomic Energy Commission (Commission). This Commission was responsible for adopting rules, regulations, and standards for the use and sources of atomic energy and ionizing radiation; conducting studies and disseminating information; and coordinating with other states and the federal government. Commission members were required to have education and training in the fields of radiology, pathology, medicine, or related sciences. The Commission was also responsible for inspecting x-ray machines and other medical radiologic equipment, but did not promulgate standards or issue licenses for radiologic technicians.

Laws 1977, Chapter 145 created the Medical Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners as a division of the Commission, since the Commission was already responsible for inspecting radiologic equipment. The purpose of the legislation was to establish standards of education, training, examination, and certification of x-ray technicians in order to protect Arizonans from the harmful effects of excessive and improper exposure to ionizing radiation. Powers and duties of the Board included setting standards and procedures for examination and certification, approving schools of radiologic technology, and determining hearing and discipline procedures. This law also created the State Radiologic Technologist Certification Fund.

Laws 1980, Chapter 206 abolished the Commission, and created the Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency and the Radiation Regulatory Hearing Board, transferring duties, funds, personnel, records, equipment and contracts. MRTBE remained one of the divisions of the agency.

Laws 1988, Chapter 340 added sections defining unethical professional conduct. This law also granted MRTBE authority to enter public or private property to conduct inspections and compliance audits, but required providing 24 hour notice prior to the inspection.

Laws 1993, Chapter 110 added Title 32, Chapter 28, Article 4 covering mammography. This measure added a mammographic technologist certificate to the list of certificates issued by MRTBE, and outlined education and reporting requirements for practitioners and facilities.

Laws 1998, Chapter 32 removed the requirement for MRTBE to provide 24 hour notice prior to inspections and compliance audits.

Laws 2001, Chapter 321 made technical changes to revise and simplify statutory language, modified fees, reduced the time that a temporary license is valid and changed the designation of Title 32, Chapter 28, Article 2 from “Licensing” to “Certification.”

Laws 2002, Chapter 233 required certification for bone densitometry and nuclear medicine technologists and added a member to the Board.

Laws 2007, Chapter 65 authorized the MRTBE to issue nondisciplinary orders requiring a certificate or permit holder to complete a prescribed number of continuing education hours.

Laws 2008, Chapter 228 established the certification for radiologist assistants, and outlined the requirements and scope of practice.

Sources

  • Statutes
    • A.R.S. §§32-2801 et seq.
    • A.R.S. §§30-651 et seq.
  • Session Laws
    • Laws 1964, Chapter 30
    • Laws 1977, Chapter 145
    • Laws 1980, Chapter 206
    • Laws 1988, Chapter 340
    • Laws 1993, Chapter 110
    • Laws 1998, Chapter 32
    • Laws 2001, Chapter 321
    • Laws 2002, Chapter 233
    • Laws 2007, Chapter 65
    • Laws 2008, Chapter 228
  • Reports
    • Performance Audit: Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency, Radiation Regulatory Hearing Board, and Medical Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners, Auditor General, Report #15-115 (2015), http://www.azauditor.gov/sites/default/files/15-115_Report.pdf
    • Medical Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners, Auditor General, Performance Audit Report No. 96-4 (1996)
  • Hearings
    • Senate Health and Welfare Committee Minutes, 33rd Legislature, 1st Regular Session, May 17, 1977
    • House of Representatives Health Committee Minutes, 33rd Legislature, 1st Regular Session, March 21, 1977
  • MRTBE Official Website: http://www.azrra.gov/mrtbe/

Related Sources

  • Arizona Administrative Code, R12-2-101 et seq.

Related collections at Arizona State Archives

  • RG 13 Atomic Energy Commission
  • RG 14 Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency

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State of Arizona Naturopathic Physicians Medical Board

Authority

The Arizona Naturopathic Physicians Medical Board was originally established in 1935.  Statutory authority is found in A.R.S.§§32-1501 et seq. and describes licensing, regulation and dispensing natural substances and devices.

Function

The Arizona Naturopathic Physicians Medical Board (Board) was established in 1935 with the mission to protect the public by regulating the practice of naturopathic medicine (Laws 1935, Chapter 105). The practice of naturopathic medicine is defined as a system of diagnosing and treating patients using natural means such as physical manipulation, clinical nutrition, herbal medicine, homeopathy, counseling, acupuncture and hydrotherapy. The Board’s responsibilities include licensing and certifying professionals; resolving complaints; and providing information to the public.

The Board consists of seven members, appointed by the Governor to five-year terms.

History

The Board was established in 1935 with the mission to protect the public by regulating the practice of naturopathic medicine. The law created a Board of Naturopathic Examiners; provided for appointment of Board members; fixed their term of office and compensation; defined naturopathy and provided for the enforcement of the law. “Naturopathy” was defined to include “all forms of physiotherapy and a system of treating the abnormalities of the human mind and body by the use of drugless and non-surgical methods, the use of physical, electrical, hygienic, and sanitary measures” (Laws 1935, Chapter 105).

The Board was renamed the State Naturopathic Physicians Board of Examiners in 1982 (Laws 1982, Chapter 210 and Laws 1982, Chapter 1, 6th Special Session). (Note: The Sixth Special Session was called by Governor Babbitt in order to correct defects and errors in six legislative enactments adopted during the regular session.)  The Board has also been named the Naturopathic Board of Medical Examiners (Laws 1992, Chapter 128); the Naturopathic Physicians Board of Medical Examiners (Laws 1995, Chapter 265); and the Naturopathic Physicians Medical Board (Laws 2008, Chapter 16).

Laws 1990, Chapter 281 required the Board to compile and publish a directory that included a listing of all Board members, all licensees, and a copy of both the laws and rules related to the Board.

Laws 1998, Chapter 284 made extensive changes to Board statutes, including provisions relating to appointment of an executive director; authority to issue temporary licenses and modifications to exams required to obtain a license to practice naturopathy.

Laws 2001, Chapter 289 added two members to the Board.

For a time, the executive director of the Naturopathic Physicians Medical Board also served as the executive director of the Board of Massage Therapy and the staff of the Naturopathic Physicians Medical Board carried out the administrative responsibilities of the Board of Massage Therapy.  The Board of Massage Therapy was created in 2003 and its finances, appropriations and executive director were all under the Naturopathic Board (Laws 2003, Chapter 202).  The boards operated independently, with distinct board members.  In 2013, the two boards were separated (Laws 2013, Chapter 108).

Sources

  • A.R.S.§§32-1501 et seq.
  • Session Laws
    • Laws 1935, Chapter 105
    • Laws 1982, Chapter 210
    • Laws 1982, Chapter 1, 6th Special Session
    • Laws 1990, Chapter 281
    • Laws 1992, Chapter 128
    • Laws 1995, Chapter 265
    • Laws 1998, Chapter 284
    • Laws 2001, Chapter 289
    • Laws 2003, Chapter 202
    • Laws 2008, Chapter 16
    • Laws 2013, Chapter 108
    • Auditor General Report 2014-106  http://www.azauditor.gov
  • Master List of State Programs

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Arizona Navigable Stream Adjudication Commission (ANSAC)

Authority:

Statutory authority to collect evidence, conduct hearings and make decisions is found at A.R.S. § 37-110l et seq. The Commission was established by Laws 1992, Chapter 297; however Laws 2001, Chapter 166 revised the adjudication process.

Function:

ANSAC is a five-member commission charged with the responsibility to review historical evidence, conduct investigations and determine the navigability of Arizona’s 39,039 watercourses at the time of statehood (February 14, 1912) in order to determine title and ownership of the streambed. The review applies to rivers and streams in the state, but does not apply to the Colorado River.

History:

If a body of water or watercourse was navigable at the time of statehood, title to the bed of the stream or lake passed to the state upon admission into the Union. A navigable watercourse is defined as one that, at the time of statehood, was used or could be used, in its ordinary and natural condition, as a highway for commerce, over which trade and travel were or could have been conducted in the customary modes of trade and travel on water. (A.R.S. §37-1101) Title to beds of waters that were not navigable at the time of statehood may pass to private landowners.
Since 1985, a series of lawsuits and legislative enactments has attempted to resolve the issue of streambed ownership in Arizona. Laws 1987, Chapter 127, which disclaimed the state’s interest in all watercourses in the state except for the Gila, Verde and Salt Rivers, was determined to be unconstitutional by the Court of Appeals in 1991 (Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest v. Hassell). In response to the Hassell case, the Legislature established the five-member Arizona Navigable Stream Adjudication Commission (ANSAC) in 1992 and outlined its duties and responsibilities to ‘collect and consider relevant historical evidence regarding navigability of watercourses in the state as of February 14, 1913, and based on the evidence determine navigable, non-navigable and identify public trust values associated with navigable watercourses. The Arizona State Land Department was required to assemble and document evidence to be used by ANSAC. Created as a separate agency, ANSAC’s charge was to review evidence presented by the State Land Department and other persons regarding navigability of Arizona’s 39,039 watercourses.
Laws 1994, Chapter 277 outlined standards to be used by ANSAC in their determinations and required a report of findings and recommendations to be submitted to the Legislature. The Legislature was obligated to conduct hearings and take action based on the recommendations.
The ANSAC held more than 50 hearings and submitted recommendations in 1998, 1999 and 2000 reporting non-navigability for 14 rivers, two creeks and small and minor watercourses in three counties. The Legislature ratified those findings which prompted a lawsuit alleging violation of the constitutional gift clause and the public trust doctrine.
On February 13, 2001, the Court of Appeals held the statutory standards used by ANSAC to determine navigability invalid (Defenders of Wildlife v. Governor Jane Dee Hull). Laws 2001, Chapter 166 repealed earlier legislative ratifications of ANSAC’s findings and directed the ANSAC to begin the adjudication process again. Since then, ANSAC has found all of Arizona’s 39,039 watercourses to have been non-navigable at the time of statehood, and therefore subject to private ownership. Various parties appealed six ANSAC determinations regarding watercourses in Pima County and Maricopa County. As of 2014, ANSAC continues to gather evidence in order to make determinations for those watercourses affected by recent court action. ANSAC has been extended several times and is scheduled to terminate on June 30, 2016 (A.R.S. § 37-1121).
Statute requires ANSAC to notify the Director of Legislative Council in writing when the Commission’s work is complete, at which time Legislative Council will prepare conforming legislation for the next regular session to terminate the Commission and revert any unexpended and unencumbered appropriations to the State General Fund.

Sources:

  • Arizona Revised Statutes § 37-1101 et seq.
  • Session laws:
  • Laws 1987, Chapter 127
  • Laws 1992, Chapter 297
  • Laws 1994, Chapter 277
  • Laws 1998, Chapter 43
  • Laws 2001, Chapter 166
  • Laws 2002, Chapter 102
  • Laws 2006, Chapter 34
  • Laws 2008, Chapter 42
  • Laws 2011, Chapter 39
  • Master List of State Government Programs
  • www.ansac.gov

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission

Authority

Originally part of the Arizona State Land Department, the Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (OGCC) was established as a stand-alone agency in 1959. Statutory authority for the OGCC is found at A.R.S. Title 27, Chapter 4, with specific powers and duties outlined in A.R.S.§27-515.

Function

The OGCC administers and enforces state laws relating to conservation of oil, natural gas, helium, carbon dioxide and geothermal resources and may enter into cooperative agreements with the federal government, state agencies and Indian tribes in order to protect fresh water supplies from contamination or pollution related to drilling a well. The OGCC is authorized to: issue permits for oil, gas and geothermal wells; monitor and inspect facilities for compliance with agency rules; issue subpoenas; maintain data related to drilling and production; publish geologic studies; and provide information related to exploration and development of resources.

The OGCC is composed of five members, appointed by the Governor to five-year terms. The State Land Commissioner serves as an ex-officio member.

History

Originally part of the Arizona State Land Department, the Oil and Gas Conservation Commission was established as a stand-alone agency in 1959.  Related responsibilities were transferred to the OGCC from the State Land Department.  See Laws 1959, Chapter 112.

Laws 1973, Chapter 43 required notice to OGCC when a well or land with a well was sold, transferred or conveyed. The measure also allowed the OGCC to collect fees to cover the cost of services for copies, forms and maps.

Laws 1988, Chapter 67 established an OGCC publication revolving fund.

Laws 1989, Chapter 142 expanded requirements for posting a bond to drill a well, allowed emergency orders to be issued without having to meet the notice requirements of A.R.S. Title 41, Chapter 6 (Arizona Administrative Procedure laws) and established a civil penalty of up to $1,000 for violations of OGCC laws.

Pursuant to legislation enacted in 1991 designed to reduce general fund expenditures, the Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS) was authorized to provide administrative and staff support to the OGCC.   The measure eliminated the authority for the OGCC to employ personnel and appoint an executive director, transferring those duties to the state geologist.  See Laws 1991, Chapter 265.

Laws 2000, Chapter 219 required the OGCC to provide 60 days notice to an operator before records could be inspected.  The measure also addressed the period of time that drilling information would be considered to be confidential.

Until 2016, the Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS) provided administrative and staff support to the OGCC.  Laws 2016, Chapter 128 transferred that responsibility to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ).  The measure authorized ADEQ to appoint a person to act on behalf of the OGCC to administer and enforce provisions of law relating to the OGCC.  Monies collected by the OGCC from the sale of maps and reports will be deposited in the ADEQ Permit Administration Fund (rather than the OGCC Publication Revolving Fund) and used to cover the cost of additional OGCC publications.

Sources

Arizona Revised Statutes

Session Laws

  • Laws 1959, Chapter 112
  • Laws 1973, Chapter 43
  • Laws 1988, Chapter 67
  • Laws 1989, Chapter 142
  • Laws 1991, Chapter 265
  • Laws 2000, Chapter 219
  • Laws 2016, Chapter 128

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission www.azogcc.az.gov

Sunset Review of the Arizona Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, submitted to the Joint Legislative Audit Committee, December 16, 2005. www.azmemory.azlibrary.gov

Related collections at Arizona State Archives:

RG 67 – Arizona Geological Survey,  Oil and Gas Commission

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Office of Ombudsman-Citizens Aide (Ombudsman)

Authority

The Arizona Office of Ombudsman-Citizens Aide was established on July 1, 1996 as an independent agent of the Arizona Legislature.  Statutory authority is found at A.R.S. §§ 41-1371 et seq.

Function

The Ombudsman reviews complaints of citizens who believe they have been treated unfairly by Arizona government.  The process of review begins with an evaluation of the complaint and may include one of the following responses: 1) coaching to allow the citizen to resolve the complaint; 2) direct communication by the Ombudsman with the agency involved; or 3) an investigation of the agency’s action.  Notice to the agency is required, unless notification would hinder the investigation.  The Ombudsman is bound by confidentiality requirements as outlined in statute.

The Ombudsman is also authorized to investigate complaints related to child safety and complaints related to public access laws involving an agency.

History

Background

The Ombudsman was originally established in order to investigate complaints brought by Arizona citizens regarding the administrative actions of state agencies.  The responsibilities were expanded in 1998 to include investigations related to Child Protective Services.  (Note: In 2014, the division of Child Protective Services in the Arizona Department of Economic Security was replaced by a stand-alone agency, called the Arizona Department of Child Safety.  See Laws 2014, Second Special Session, Chapter 1). In 2007, the Ombudsman responsibilities were expanded to include investigation of complaints related to public records and open meeting laws.

Session Laws

Laws 1995, Chapter 281 established the Office of the Ombudsman, effective July 1, 1996, to “investigate citizens’ complaints by investigating administrative acts of state agencies and to issue an annual report to the Governor, Legislature and the public.”  Services were available to all Arizona citizens, although the Office was not authorized to investigate complaints filed by a person in the custody of the Arizona Department of Corrections.  The measure outlined the selection process and term of office for  the Ombudsman; the scope of investigations; confidentiality requirements; procedures; protections; location of the office; and reporting requirements.

In 1997, the Ombudsman was authorized to appoint an assistant to investigate complaints relating to Child Protective Services.  The law provided access to records and the case management system maintained by the Department of Economic Security, Child Protective Service office.  Information gathered during the investigation was considered confidential and was not subject to disclosure.  See Laws 1997, Second Special Session, Chapter 3.

Laws 2000, Chapter 47 authorized the Ombudsman to issue subpoenas if necessary and only if a prior request had been made and the person or agency failed to comply within a reasonable time.

Laws 2006, Chapter 370 authorized the appointment of two assistants by the Ombudsman in order to investigate complaints regarding public access laws involving an agency.  The assistants were required to provide training, educational materials and programs to public officials.  The measure also required information on the number of requests, inquiries and investigations related to public access laws to be included in the Ombudsman’s annual report.

Laws 2012, Chapter 107 appointed Dennis Wells as the Ombudsman-Citizen Aide to a five year term, through June 30, 2017.  Statute requires the appointment of the Ombudsman-Citizen Aide to be proposed as a legislative measure which must be approved by at least two-thirds of the membership of each chamber of the Legislature.

Laws 2014, Chapter 204 required the Ombudsman to provide the annual report to the Governor’s Office of Strategic Planning and Budgeting, the Joint Legislative Budget Committee and the Administrative Rules Oversight Committee.  The distribution was in addition to existing requirements to provide the annual report to various entities, including the Governor, Legislature and public.

Laws 2014, Second Special Session, Chapter 1 abolished the office of Child Protective Services and transferred its responsibilities and authority to the newly established Department of Child Safety.  The measure included conforming changes to Ombudsman statutes.

Sources

  • Arizona Revised Statutes
    • §§ 41-1377 through 41-1383
  • Session Laws
    • Laws 1995, Chapter 281
    • Laws 1997, Second Special Session, Chapter 3
    • Laws 2000, Chapter 47
    • Laws 2006, Chapter 370
    • Laws 2012, Chapter 107
    • Laws 2014, Chapter 204
    • Laws 2014, Second Special Session, Chapter 1
  • Agency website: www.azoca.gov

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Arizona Board of Osteopathic Examiners in Medicine and Surgery (Board)

Authority

The Board was initially created in 1941 (Laws 1941, Chapter 33). Current statutory authority is found in A.R.S.§§32-1800 et seq.

Function

Osteopathic physicians receive similar training to allopathic physicians (M.D.) as well as training in the musculoskeletal system and manipulation. They are qualified for unlimited medical practice in all 50 states. The Board licenses and regulates doctors of osteopathic medicine, including interns and residents receiving post-graduate training in Arizona hospitals and clinics. The Board is also authorized to develop and publish advisory opinions and standards governing the profession and to make available to academic and research organizations public records regarding statistical information on doctors of osteopathic medicine and applicants for licensure.

The Board sets educational and training standards for licensure and reviews complaints made against osteopathic physicians, interns and residents to ensure their conduct meets the standards of the profession, as outlined in statute. An Executive Director, hired by the Board, is responsible for administering the agency according to state law.

The Board consists of seven members: five osteopathic doctors and two public members. The Governor appoints members to five-year terms. A member may serve a second consecutive five-year term.

History

Regulation of the practice of osteopathy was established by Laws 1941, Chapter 33. The measure required a license to practice osteopathy, created a three-member State Board of Osteopathic Examiners, and prescribed the powers and duties of the Board. The Governor appointed Board members for a term of six years.

In 1949, the Board was renamed the State Osteopathic Board of Registration and Examination in Medicine and Surgery.  In 1970, the name was changed to the Board of Osteopathic Examiners in Medicine and Surgery.

Board makeup

In 1949, the Legislature repealed the 1941 measure and rewrote the laws for the profession. At that time, the Board was increased to five members, including one member of the lay public who had no connection to the profession. Four members were required to be physicians or surgeons, who had been engaged in the practice of osteopathic medicine for at least two years prior to their appointment. The Board was also vested with the power to approve hospitals for intern training and to approve osteopathic schools and colleges for physician training (Laws 1949, Chapter 121). In 1970, the experience requirement to serve on the Board was increased to five years (Laws 1970, Chapter 138).

Laws 1988, Chapter 105 modified qualifications for board membership and prohibited board members from serving more than two consecutive five-year terms.

In 1992, board membership was increased from five members to seven, by adding one public member and one person engaged in the practice of osteopathic medicine who had been in good standing for five years (Laws 1992, Chapter 150).

Laws 1994, Chapter 247 authorized the Governor to remove any board member who failed to attend three or more board meetings within a 12-month period.

Other provisions

Laws 1979, Chapter 46 increased the cost of a license from $75 to $150 and modified Board authority to investigate cases of unprofessional conduct.

Two measures adopted in 1989 related to the Board. The first authorized the Board to license specialists and medical assistants (Laws 1989, Chapter 110). The second established a jurisdiction arbitration panel to address complaints made against a person with a dual license to practice as a homeopath and an osteopath (Laws 1989, Chapter 275).

In 1990, legislation was adopted that allowed a physician to disclose certain information to the Department of Health Services regarding positive tests for the human immunodeficiency virus. The law did not impost a duty to disclose such information and stated a physician was not civilly or criminally liable for either disclosing or not disclosing information (Laws 1990, Chapter 335).

Laws 2004, Chapter 138 modified the qualifications to serve on the Board by requiring members to practice medicine with actual patient contact.

Sources

  • A.R.S.§§32-1800 et seq.
  • Session Laws
    • Laws 1941, Chapter 33
    • Laws 1949, Chapter 121
    • Laws 1970, Chapter 138
    • Laws 1979, Chapter 46
    • Laws 1988, Chapter 105
    • Laws 1989, Chapter 110 and Chapter 275
    • Laws 1990, Chapter 335
    • Laws 1992, Chapter 150
    • Laws 1994, Chapter 247
    • Laws 1998, Chapter 254
    • Laws 2004, Chapter 138
  • Arizona Auditor General Performance Audits http://azauditor.gov
  • https://www.azdo.gov/Board

Arizona Outdoor Recreation Coordinating Commission (AORCC)

Authority

AORCC was created as a stand-alone agency in 1965, in response to enactment of the federal Land and Water Conservation Act.  It was originally responsible for planning, coordinating and administering the state’s outdoor recreation program.  In 1984, AORCC’ was combined with the Arizona State Parks to serve in an advisory capacity to the State Parks Board (State Parks).  Statutory authority is found at A.R.S. §41-511.25 and §41-511.26.

Function

AORCC recommends distribution of federal and state monies for recreational projects and serves an advisory role to State Parks.   AORCC consists of seven members who have expertise in parks and outdoor recreation.  Five members are appointed by the Governor to terms of three years.  The director of the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the director of the Arizona State Parks Board serve as ex officio members.

History

Background

The Land and Water Conservation Fund was established by Congress to safeguard natural areas, water resources, and provide recreation opportunities.  The program provides matching grants to state and local governments as part of an effort to establish a national recreation policy and encourage each state to develop long range plans for outdoor recreation.  (National Parks Service: Land and Water Conservation Fund History)

Among its duties, State Parks is responsible for planning and administering a statewide parks and recreation program including programs established under the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965. (A.R.S. §41-511.04)

Session Laws

Laws 1965, Chapter 68 established the three-member AORCC, outlined its duties and appropriated $30,000 to AORCC.  The monies were to be used to carry out the provisions of the act and could be used to match funds provided by the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Laws 1976, Chapter 86 increased the number of members of AORCC to seven, with five members appointed by the Governor.  Terms were increased from two years to three years.

Laws 1984, Chapter 182 transferred the responsibilities and authority of AORCC to State Parks and changed AORCC’s role to advisory.  All AORCC personnel, furnishings, equipment, records, and unexpended and unencumbered monies were transferred to State Parks.

Laws 1987, Chapter 228 authorized AORCC to determine funding for projects using monies from the Law Enforcement and Boating Safety Fund, in addition to its existing authority to determine funding for projects using monies from the Land and Water Conservation Fund and the State Lake Improvement Fund.

Laws 1989, Chapter 193 authorized AORCC to determine funding for projects using monies from the Off Highway Vehicle Recreation Fund.

Laws 2011, Chapter 333 transferred responsibility for administration and distribution of monies from the Law Enforcement and Boating Safety Fund from State Parks and AORCC to the State Treasurer.

Sources

Arizona Revised Statutes

Session Laws

  • Laws 1965, Chapter 68
  • Laws 1976, Chapter 86
  • Laws 1984, Chapter 182
  • Laws 1987, Chapter 228
  • Laws 1989, Chapter 193
  • Laws 2011, Chapter 333

National Parks Service www.nps.gov  Land and Water Conservation Fund History

Related collections at Arizona State Archives:

RG 151 – Arizona Outdoor Recreation Coordinating Commission

MG 28 – Arizona State Parks Association

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Agencies by Title

A-C D-F G-I J-L
M-O P-R S-U V-X