Murderous Weaver, Arizona

Weaver 11-30-1898 (2)

On November 30, 1898, the Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner reported on the murder and robbery of William Segna, an Austrian saloonkeeper in Weaver, a mining town by then notorious for crime and murders. Approximately $440 of gold and cash were stolen, which translates to over $11,000 in today’s dollars. This particular murder caused several newspapers, even the Arizona Republican in Phoenix, to call for the town’s dissolution!

Weaver Arizona Republican 12-1898 (2)

Other papers carrying the story noted a list of murders that took place in the town’s bloody history: “The murders of the Martin family, Stanton, Gribble, Verdier, and many others, the numerous stage hold ups, robbery and a general chapter of criminal lawlessness, has given Weaver a stain that time cannot wipe away.”

weaver proclamation

 

Five months later, no one had been arrested for the murder. Territorial Governor Nathan Oakes Murphy offered a $300 reward (roughly $8000 in today’s dollars) for the arrest of the perpetrator(s), which was published in the April 19, 1899 Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner.

 

 

 

 

Weaver- Lucero image

 

Vicento Lucero would stand trial in Prescott for Segna’s murder in June of 1899, and was sentenced to natural life in Yuma Territorial Prison and later transferred to Florence. Petitions for his pardon began circulating in Maricopa and Yavapai counties in 1911 and he would eventually be pardoned in 1915.  He possibly shows up in the 1930 census, living in Congress, having outlasted prison and Weaver.

 

weaver parole

 

Despite the demands to close up Weaver, a post office would still be established in 1899, but that lasted only 11 months until moving south to Octave. The town was originally known as Weaverville, but was later shortened. It was named for scout Pauline Weaver, and was east of Stanton and north of Octave, around Rich Hill. The ghost town of Weaver is located about 18 miles north of Wickenburg, Arizona. Weaver was deserted by 1900, and is one of several Arizona ghost towns.  A few crumbling buildings remain unwiped by time today.

For more information Weaver and the surrounding towns, we have several books in our Arizona Collection.

weaver-books.jpg

References:

Anderson, P. (2013) Cemeteries of Yavapai County. Charleston, South Carolina : Arcadia.

The Weaver Murder. (1898, November 30). Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner. Retrieved from the Arizona Memory Project:  http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/digital/collection/sn85032938/id/3337

To Wipe out Weaver. (1898, December 2). The Arizona Republican. Retrieved from the Arizona Memory Project:   http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/digital/collection/sn84020558/id/60569

Moving for Parole of Vicente Lucero. (1911, July 20). Arizona Republican. Retrieved from the Arizona Memory Project:   http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/digital/collection/sn84020558/id/15572/rec/1

Ter-Nedden, D. (n.a.). Weaver, Arizona Ghost Town [Website] . Retrieved from: http://www.ghosttowngallery.com/htme/weaver.htm

Proclamation of Reward. (1899, April 19). Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner. Retrieved from the Arizona Memory Project:   http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/digital/collection/sn85032938/id/3438/rec/11

Seeking a Pardon for Vicente Lucero. (1911, May 28) The Arizona Republican. Retrieved from the Arizona Memory Project:   http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/digital/collection/sn84020558/id/14754

 

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Arizona Territorial Census Records Now Available Online!

A significant group of valuable Arizona historical record collections, provided through a partnership with the Arizona State Archives and Ancestry.com, are now available on-line and free to residents of the State of Arizona through Ancestry.com.  This includes the Arizona territorial census records covering the years from 1864 through 1882.

All Arizona records are available at azlibrary.gov and can be found on the Doing Research at the Archives page or directly at https://www.azlibrary.gov/arm/research-archives/archives-resources/ancestry-arizona.

This access requires a free Ancestry.com Arizona account. To set up your account you simply go to the web page and enter your five digit Arizona zip code in the space at the bottom of the page.  Once your account is established researchers gain unlimited access to Arizona records that are a part of the State Archives of Arizona’s extensive holdings.

Veterans in AZ: Telling Their Story With Census Data

The U.S. Census Bureau collects demographic, social, and economic data on veterans.  Such data includes unemployment rate, household income, business ownership, period of service, educational attainment, health care and age distribution. The data is used for policy analysis, program planning, and budgeting of veteran programs.

As we celebrate those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces this Veterans Day, come learn about this important part of Arizona’s citizenry. This is a hands-on training; participants will be on-line with the Instructor following along with their own computer/laptop to learn how to navigate the census website and access Veteran’s data.

Presented by Pauline Nunez, U.S. Census Bureau

Date: Tuesday November 1, 2016

Time: 9:00 a.m.

Location: Webinar

To Register for this webinar: https://census.webex.com/census/k2/j.php?MTID=t7d8b03c3faebaccae1992708856adf86

 

Join Us for an Upcoming Event!

September 14, 2016 – Using Census Data/Tools for Business Planning and Market Analysis: Introducing Census Business Builder

Using Census Data September 14

This hands-on training will provide an introduction to Census Bureau Economic Programs and related Business Concepts, the American Community Survey demographics and the latest Business tool: Census Business Builder.   A new Web application,Census Business Builder: Regional Analyst Edition now available in beta, allows users to build a region from one or more counties and create a report for the entire region and the individual business sectors within the region.  This second edition of Census Business Builder follows the successful launch of Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition, which provides statistics for a single type of business and area on the same demographic and economic characteristics as the new edition.

Who should attend? Small business owners, consultants, Small Business Development Training Centers, financial institutions, micro lending organizations, and any organization that targets small businesses and economic development.

Seating is limited.  Registration is required. Training will be hands on, please bring your laptop.  Wi-Fi access available.  Free parking on site.

About presenter Pauline Nuñez:

Pauline Núñez develops and conducts training programs on U.S. Census Data for state/local government, tribal nations, Congressional Districts, nonprofit, health care, and economic development organizations throughout South Central Texas, the Texas-Mexico borderlands and Arizona. She has over 25 years’ experience in community development micro lending, grant writing, marketing and business development for small businesses and non-profit management.

To register for the 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. session, click here.

To register for the 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. session, click here.