Rainy Day Coloring and Activity Books

Need some quick coloring activity books for a rainy day?  Our state and federal government agencies put together resources for children (and the young at heart!) that can be downloaded and printed quickly and are educational as well as fun.  You can search our catalog for many of these.

To do this, go to our catalog and search for “coloring book” or “activity book”.  You will get different results for each term, so make sure you search for both!  On the left, under Format, select online resources- this will give you all of the items that can be downloaded via a link in the catalog so that you can print a copy to color.

Here are some to get you started!

From the Secretary of State’s Office, SoS for Kids, a coloring book about Arizona.

Color book sos

 

From the Arizona Department of Transportation, Be Aware and Care, an activity book about travel and highway safety.color book adot

 

From the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wetlands, a coloring book about wetlands and the animals that inhabit wetlands.

color us game

 

From the Environmental Protection Agency, Carl Gets Some Rest, a coloring book about pollution and using public transportation.

color book epa

And from NASA, To Space & Back: How We Can All Use NASA’s Tools, a coloring book about products that were developed for the space program that are being used to make life on earth better.

color book nasa

 

You can find dozens more Federally published coloring books by going to the Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.  Select Electronic Titles under “Catalogs” and then search for “coloring books”.

Enjoy coloring and learning something interesting along the way!

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The Capitol Stacks!

capitol_stacks_2017_1_final_page_1

To read the February 2017 issue of the Capitol Stacks, click on the image above.

To receive future issues, use the button below:

Arizona General Election Canvass

Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan issued the official canvass of results for the 2016 General Election.

Secretary Reagan reported 2.6 million Arizonans voted in the general election, making it the highest number of ballots cast in state history.  While there were a historic number of votes, turnout was about average at 74% ranking 6th highest in Arizona history.

1.       1980       –    80.1%        Reagan – Carter
2.       2008       –    77.7%        Obama – McCain
3.       1992       –    77.2%        Clinton – Bush
4.       2004       –    77.1%        Bush – Kerry
5.       2012       –    74.4%        Obama – Romney
6.       2016       –    74.2%        Trump – Clinton

Demographically, women made up 55% of Arizona’s electorate while 18-24 year olds made up 6%.  The average age of the Arizona voter is 55.

For more, visit: https://www.azsos.gov/about-office/media-center/press-releases/1150

To see past election canvasses, check out the Arizona State Government Publications Collection on the Arizona Memory Project:

http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/cdm/ref/collection/statepubs/id/13234

Who invents voting machines?

votingmachinepatentWe often hear about some interesting inventions here at the State Library’s Patent and Trademark Resource Center, but every now and then we are reminded that something we take for granted like voting machines indeed have to be invented and can be the subject of patents. For more voting related patents, check out the latest issue of the Inventor’s Eye, from the USPTO.

https://www.uspto.gov/learning-and-resources/newsletter/inventors-eye/election-year-patents-rocked-vote

 

The Completion and Furnishing of the Capitol Building

introduced-bill-hb-095_page_1 There are many old documents in the State Library of Arizona’s Collection, and some of the most exciting are the introduced bills. One such bill is H.B. No. 95, from the Territorial Legislature of 1899. Titled, “An Act to Provide for the Completion and Furnishing of the Capitol Building,” it is the bill responsible for the historic copper-domed capitol building.

To see the whole document, click on the image.

To see what was passed into law, check out the Territorial Session Laws Collection contributed by the Daniel F. Cracchiolo Law Library, James E. Rogers College of Law.  (Hint, the tax rate was reduced from five cents per $100 to three-and-a-half cents per $100).