New Arizona Historic Newspapers Now Online!

Two historic Arizona newspapers, the Winslow Mail (Winslow, AZ) and El Mosquito (Tucson, AZ), are now available to the public on the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America website. The newspapers represent the first 10,000 pages of over 100,000 pages to be digitized through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP).

Winslow MailThe Winslow Mail delivered general news of northern Arizona and the Santa Fe Railway, as well as ranching and agricultural news. It is now available online from 1897 to 1926.

In 1897, John F. Wallace was the editor and publisher. Known fondly as “Uncle Jimmy,” Wallace participated in local politics, and his political interests permeated the Mail. After 1901, the Winslow Mail shifted hands several times. Owners and editors included Lloyd C. Henning from the Holbrook Argus and L.V. Root, a former editor of the Needles Nugget in California. The Winslow Mail was published for 113 years, ceasing operations in 2007.

El Mosquito

 

El Mosquito, was a weekly Spanish-language newspaper helmed by editor and publisher Felipe Hale. It delivered general local news, news from Mexico, and humorous columns to its Tucson, Arizona audience. It was also known for its sharp tongue and lively writing. Its slogan, appearing in its first few years of publication, was “Pica, pero no hace roncha” (“It stings, but it doesn’t leave a mark.”) El Mosquito ran from 1919-1925, the paper’s entire run is available online.

In 2017, the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records received a grant as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program to begin this digitization work. The newspapers will also be available on the Arizona Memory Project website in the near future.

The State of Arizona Research Library is excited to make these historic newspapers digitally available to the public. Look for additional newspaper titles to be available online soon!

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Searching Legislative History

One of the most common requests we get at the State of Arizona Research Library is how to research the legislative history of a particular law. How did it come into existence? Who originally came up with the idea for the law? How long did it take to pass? When did it pass? And has it changed since that time?

Our amazing law librarian has come up with this helpful “cheat sheet” of information on how to perform a legislative history. Use it, print it, share it all you like. If you still find yourself stuck or can’t find it online, contact us! We have a lot more material in our physical collection that may be helpful as well.

journal of the house

How To Start

Find the statute in the print Arizona Revised Statute (A.R.S.) annotated or an annotated online source. Look for “added by” for the 1st time it was enacted. If it says “amended by,” there’s an earlier enactment. Look for it in the superseded A.R.S.

Determine the Year

Is it Before 1997? 

  1. Find the Session Laws. Session Laws are the enacted version of the legislation. Jot down the bill number, found after the chapter number.
  2. Check the bill file. The State of Arizona Research Library has these bill files on microfilm:
  • Senate bills between 1969 and 1990.
  • House bills between 1971 and 1994.
  • After those dates but before 1997, call the Clerk of the House of Representatives at 602-926-3032 or the Senate Resource Center at 602-926-3559.

Before the late 1960’s, the bill file probably doesn’t exist, as most were destroyed in a flood. Your issue may be in the History of the Arizona State Legislature 1912-1967 which included an analysis of major issues, debate, & news coverage by session. It is now on microfiche in the Reading Room but soon it will be digitized! Thank you, Library Services and Technology Act!

  1. Use the bill number to check Journals from the Arizona House and Senate. Start by finding the bill number in the index at the end of the volume. Then check each cited page for legislative process and committees that heard the bill. Journals may have text of amendments, floor speeches, & conference committee info. There will be different information in the Journal of each chamber, so be sure to check both!

 

Is it 1989 – 1997?

  1. Go to the Arizona Legislature website. Enter the bill number into the search box at top right. You won’t find everything you need, but it’s a convenient source to get started.
  2. Next, refer to before-1997 steps above.

 

Is it 1997 or more current?

  1. Find the Session Law from the Arizona Legislature website. Set the Year and Session using the yellow drop-down menu at the top. Scroll down to Chapter number. Jot down the bill number.
  2. Use the bill tracker from the Arizona Legislature website. Set the correct Year and Session. Enter the 4-digit bill number in search box at the top right. The titles in the blue bar close to the top are links to more information.
  3. For committee minutes, jot down committees & dates. Go to Agendas on the left-hand side of the page. Choose Senate or House & select the Committee. Click on the meeting date. Click the blue Committee Minutes link.
  4. To search topics, try “search” on the left-hand side and use keywords.
  5. Check for interim, special, or study committee reports. Look for some more Legislative Study Committee Reports in our State Documents Collection on the Arizona Memory Project (link does not reflect a complete search of Legislative Committees).

 

Still can’t find what you’re looking for?

microfilm2Journals may have info on interim, special, & study committees. Check current year and a year or two before. Search our State Documents Collection for Committee reports.

The State of Arizona Archives has some minutes filed by House committees between 1965 and 2016. Jot down the name of committees & meeting dates, then call them at 602-926-3720 or fill out a research request form.

We have numerous newspapers on microfilm, including the Capitol Times & its predecessors. Important and controversial issues of the day often appeared in the news.

To view print material, you can visit us in the Reading Room of the Polly Rosenbaum History and Archives Building located at 1901 W. Madison in Phoenix. We are open Monday through Friday, except on state holidays.

polly-building-at-sunset-crp2

Researching the Old Legal Stuff

YaleWe recently purchased The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History, a new resource to help you find historical legal information that is very specialized or pre-dates the information that is readily available online. Some of the resources are digitized, and some only in print. It is available to use in the Reading Room at the Polly Rosenbaum Archives and History Building.

For example, if you are looking for the laws on witchcraft, this source tells you step-by-step how to find them. Witchcraft was originally designated as a felony in the United Kingdom and carried the death penalty. Later revisions passed by Queen Elizabeth I reduced the severity of the penalty if nobody got hurt. This change enabled herbalists to practice their craft. Maybe this was the origin of the No Harm, No Foul standard.

Yale TOC

Later chapters address later eras. Apparently practice manuals were widely used in the Colonial era by justices, officials, and educated citizens. Some states had constitutions that predated the adoption of the Federal Constitution, and this reference has information on both, as well information on how to access statutes and cases from the early days of the Republic. Later chapters explain how the Reporter system for publishing case law was a pioneering innovation, how to do archival research, searching administrative law, and the advent of legal forms.

 

DictionariesAnother chapter discusses how international law and treaties affect U.S. law. Another introduces the use of dictionaries and biographical sources. The book concludes with tips for researching newspapers, statistical resources, and public records.

If you don’t know where to find the historical legal topic you are researching, we may just look here first!

List of individuals who have lain in state at the Arizona State Capitol

  • Governor Joseph H. Kibbey, 1924
    (1924, June 15). Judge Joseph H. Kibbey Of Phoenix Dies. The Arizona Republican.
  • Secretary of State J. C. Callaghan, 1929
    (1929, January 28). Callaghan Succumbs In Hospital. The Arizona Republican.
  • Major William Paul Geary, 1929
    (1929, December 6). Maj. W. P. Geary Dies In Veterans’ Hospital, Body To Lie In State. The Arizona Republican.
  • Governor George W. P. Hunt, 1934
    (1934, December 26). George W. P. Hunt’s Rites Are Set Friday. The Arizona Republic.
  • Pioneer Scott White, 1935
    (1935, March 6). White, Scott. The Arizona Republic.
  • Pioneer Daniel P. Jones, 1935
    (1935, July 9). Jones Rites Slated Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • General Oscar F. Temple, 1936
    (1936, February 7). General’s Last Rites Due Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Legislator Rose F. Godfrey, 1936
    (1936, August 3). Rose F. Godfrey Rites Set Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Benjamin B. Moeur, 1937
    (1937, March 19). Former Governor Is Paid Last Respects. The Phoenix Gazette.
  • Secretary of State Harry M. Moore, 1942
    (1942, November 24). Moore Funeral Is Set; Body To Lie In State At Capitol. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor John C. Phillips, 1943
    (1943, June 27). Ex-Governor To Lie In State Tomorrow; Rites Set Tuesday. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Thomas Campbell, 1944
    (1944, March 3). Campbell Body To Lie In State At Capitol. The Arizona Republic.
  • William B. Kelly, 1948
    (1948, February 15). Pioneer State Editor, Dies. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Sidney P. Osborn, 1948
    Turnbow, B. (1948, May 28). Nation Joins State, City In Tribute: Thousands From All Walks Pay Respects To Fallen Governor. The Phoenix Gazette.
  • State Legislator W. G. Rosenbaum, 1949
    (1949, January 14). State To Pay Rosenbaum Honor Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Judge Alfred C. Lockwood, 1951
    (1951, October 31). Famed State Jurist Dies. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Legislator Elijah Allen, 1953
    (1953, July 3). Body Of Elijah Allen To Lie In State At Capitol Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Ira H. Hayes, 1955
    Dedera, D. (1955, January 28). Pima Tribesmen Weep at Farewell to War Hero Brother Ira Hayes. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Senator (and State Librarian)  Mulford Winsor, 1956
    (1956, November 7). Mulford Winsor Is Dead. The Phoenix Gazette.
  • Bill Turnbow, 1957
    King, B. (1957, June 29). Body of Turnbow Will Lie In State. The Arizona Republic.
  • Judge Arthur T. La Prade, 1957
    (1957, July 2). LaPrade’s Body To Lie In State Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Constitutional Delegate Alexander Tuthill, 1958
    (1958, May 27). Tuthill. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Robert T. Jones, 1958
    (1958, June 12). Body Of Ex-Governor Jones To Lie In State In State Capitol Rotunda. The Arizona Republic.
  • ASU President Grady Gammage, 1959
    Meibert, V. (1959, December 23). Death Unexpected For ASU President. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor R. C. Stanford. 1963
    (1963, December 16). Came Here as Boy in Covered Wagon. The Arizona Republic.
  • Leslie C. Hardy, 1968
    (1968, October 19). Leslie Hardy directed revision of Arizona Code. The Arizona Republic.
  • Senator Carl Hayden, 1972
    (1972, January 26). Public Funeral Services Saturday: Former Sen. Hayden. The Daily Courier.
  • Arizona Senator Harold Giss, 1973
    (1973, April 18). Memorial Session at Capitol Today: Legislators Pay Last Respects to Giss. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Dan Garvey, 1974
    (1974, February 7). Ex-Gov. Dan E. Garvey to lie in state at Capitol. The Arizona Republic.
  • Judge Charles C. Bernstein, 1976
    (1976, April 30). Charles Bernstein Dies at 71; Ex-Justice on State High Court. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Wesley Bolin, 1978
    Swanson, J. (1978, March 6). Wesley Bolin Lies in State at Capitol Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Mine Inspector Verne C. McCutchan, 1978
    (1978, August 22). Arizona mine inspector dies after illness. The Arizona Republic.
  • Jesse Owens, 1980
    Sowers, C. (1980, April 3). Hundreds Pay Respects to Jesse Owens. The Arizona Republic.
  • Chief Justice Jesse Udall, 1980
    Richards, J. M. Jesse A. Udall: Republican in House from Graham County –Tenth and Eleventh Legislatures of Arizona. Compiled for the Arizona Legislative Council.
  • Governor Ernest W. McFarland, 1984
    (1984, June 9). Death takes Ernest W. McFarland, former governor, legislator, jurist. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Senator Marilyn Jarrett, 2006
    (2006, March 16). Marilyn Jarrett. The Arizona Republic.
  • Senator John S. McCain III, 2018
    Hansen, R. (2018, August 29). John McCain remembered at state Capitol ceremony: ‘We can be proud he was our senator.’ AZCentral.com
  • Representative Ed Pastor, 2018
    Coppola, C. & Burkitt, B.  (2018, November 30). Former Congressman Ed Pastor to lie in state at Arizona Capitol on Sunday AZCentral.com

 

Researching Arizona’s place names

place names 3Questions regarding colorful Arizona place names often take place on the highways, where exit signs point to places like “Bloody Basin Road.” If curiosity survives the miles, where can someone look up how these places get named?

There are two standard works for such research: Arizona Place Names by Will C. Barnes and Arizona’s Names: X Marks the Place by Byrd Howell Granger, and both have a place in the State Research Library’s ready reference collection due to frequent use. The library’s copy of original edition of Barnes’ book is heavily annotated and the first few pages are falling apart.

The two books have an intertwined history: Arizona Historian Will C. Barnes’ book was first printed in 1935. Granger revised Barnes’ book for the University of Arizona Press in 1960. Granger published her own book in 1983, and the current edition of Arizona Place Names was published in 1988, and remains in print.
place names 2
The bibliography for the current Barnes book is two pages. Granger’s book contains nine pages of cited publications and three pages of persons interviewed for oral history. Granger explains “Where a family name is cited, the reference is to information learned during visits with “old timers” or those knowing local history. During the early years of research, the oral sources were most important, for the true pioneers were increasingly being silenced by time.”
Both Barnes and Granger give the location of the place name. Sometimes more than one place in Arizona has the same name!

So to answer the question of Bloody Basin, according to Barnes, it is “Said to have been so called because of the many battles with Indians that took place in this region.” (Barnes,54). Granger repeats this, but also adds that “Fred Henry and four other prospectors were attacked here by Apaches in May 1864 and all were wounded. Henry went for help despite having been wounded in both legs.” She also notes the story of a bridge over a gorge where Bloody Basin is: “During one of these crossings, the suspension bridge collapsed and the sheep fell to a bloody death in the “basin” below.” (Granger, 76).

Join us for an upcoming event!

February 22, 2017 – ReferenceUSA Workshop

referenceusa_feb_22_2017

 

Learn to use ReferenceUSA!

Get fast and easy access to details on more than 42 million U.S. businesses and more than 260 million U.S. residents. Information includes; company name, address, phone, executive contact names, employee size, SIC and NAICS codes, credit ratings, etc…..

Use ReferenceUSA to:

  • Conduct market research
  • Build a business plan
  • Locate Sales leads and download lists
  • Locate companies for employment opportunities
    And much more…..

Presented by Kam Draper.

Date: Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Time: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Location: State Library of Arizona, Con Cronin Commons (formerly 3rd Floor Training Area) 1700 W. Washington St. (State Capitol), Phoenix, AZ 85007