Researching the Old Legal Stuff

YaleWe recently purchased The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History, a new resource to help you find historical legal information that is very specialized or pre-dates the information that is readily available online. Some of the resources are digitized, and some only in print. It is available to use in the Reading Room at the Polly Rosenbaum Archives and History Building.

For example, if you are looking for the laws on witchcraft, this source tells you step-by-step how to find them. Witchcraft was originally designated as a felony in the United Kingdom and carried the death penalty. Later revisions passed by Queen Elizabeth I reduced the severity of the penalty if nobody got hurt. This change enabled herbalists to practice their craft. Maybe this was the origin of the No Harm, No Foul standard.

Yale TOC

Later chapters address later eras. Apparently practice manuals were widely used in the Colonial era by justices, officials, and educated citizens. Some states had constitutions that predated the adoption of the Federal Constitution, and this reference has information on both, as well information on how to access statutes and cases from the early days of the Republic. Later chapters explain how the Reporter system for publishing case law was a pioneering innovation, how to do archival research, searching administrative law, and the advent of legal forms.

 

DictionariesAnother chapter discusses how international law and treaties affect U.S. law. Another introduces the use of dictionaries and biographical sources. The book concludes with tips for researching newspapers, statistical resources, and public records.

If you don’t know where to find the historical legal topic you are researching, we may just look here first!

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List of individuals who have lain in state at the Arizona State Capitol

  • Governor Joseph H. Kibbey, 1924
    (1924, June 15). Judge Joseph H. Kibbey Of Phoenix Dies. The Arizona Republican.
  • Secretary of State J. C. Callaghan, 1929
    (1929, January 28). Callaghan Succumbs In Hospital. The Arizona Republican.
  • Major William Paul Geary, 1929
    (1929, December 6). Maj. W. P. Geary Dies In Veterans’ Hospital, Body To Lie In State. The Arizona Republican.
  • Governor George W. P. Hunt, 1934
    (1934, December 26). George W. P. Hunt’s Rites Are Set Friday. The Arizona Republic.
  • Pioneer Scott White, 1935
    (1935, March 6). White, Scott. The Arizona Republic.
  • Pioneer Daniel P. Jones, 1935
    (1935, July 9). Jones Rites Slated Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • General Oscar F. Temple, 1936
    (1936, February 7). General’s Last Rites Due Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Legislator Rose F. Godfrey, 1936
    (1936, August 3). Rose F. Godfrey Rites Set Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Benjamin B. Moeur, 1937
    (1937, March 19). Former Governor Is Paid Last Respects. The Phoenix Gazette.
  • Secretary of State Harry M. Moore, 1942
    (1942, November 24). Moore Funeral Is Set; Body To Lie In State At Capitol. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor John C. Phillips, 1943
    (1943, June 27). Ex-Governor To Lie In State Tomorrow; Rites Set Tuesday. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Thomas Campbell, 1944
    (1944, March 3). Campbell Body To Lie In State At Capitol. The Arizona Republic.
  • William B. Kelly, 1948
    (1948, February 15). Pioneer State Editor, Dies. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Sidney P. Osborn, 1948
    Turnbow, B. (1948, May 28). Nation Joins State, City In Tribute: Thousands From All Walks Pay Respects To Fallen Governor. The Phoenix Gazette.
  • State Legislator W. G. Rosenbaum, 1949
    (1949, January 14). State To Pay Rosenbaum Honor Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Judge Alfred C. Lockwood, 1951
    (1951, October 31). Famed State Jurist Dies. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Legislator Elijah Allen, 1953
    (1953, July 3). Body Of Elijah Allen To Lie In State At Capitol Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Ira H. Hayes, 1955
    Dedera, D. (1955, January 28). Pima Tribesmen Weep at Farewell to War Hero Brother Ira Hayes. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Senator (and State Librarian)  Mulford Winsor, 1956
    (1956, November 7). Mulford Winsor Is Dead. The Phoenix Gazette.
  • Bill Turnbow, 1957
    King, B. (1957, June 29). Body of Turnbow Will Lie In State. The Arizona Republic.
  • Judge Arthur T. La Prade, 1957
    (1957, July 2). LaPrade’s Body To Lie In State Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Constitutional Delegate Alexander Tuthill, 1958
    (1958, May 27). Tuthill. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Robert T. Jones, 1958
    (1958, June 12). Body Of Ex-Governor Jones To Lie In State In State Capitol Rotunda. The Arizona Republic.
  • ASU President Grady Gammage, 1959
    Meibert, V. (1959, December 23). Death Unexpected For ASU President. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor R. C. Stanford. 1963
    (1963, December 16). Came Here as Boy in Covered Wagon. The Arizona Republic.
  • Leslie C. Hardy, 1968
    (1968, October 19). Leslie Hardy directed revision of Arizona Code. The Arizona Republic.
  • Senator Carl Hayden, 1972
    (1972, January 26). Public Funeral Services Saturday: Former Sen. Hayden. The Daily Courier.
  • Arizona Senator Harold Giss, 1973
    (1973, April 18). Memorial Session at Capitol Today: Legislators Pay Last Respects to Giss. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Dan Garvey, 1974
    (1974, February 7). Ex-Gov. Dan E. Garvey to lie in state at Capitol. The Arizona Republic.
  • Judge Charles C. Bernstein, 1976
    (1976, April 30). Charles Bernstein Dies at 71; Ex-Justice on State High Court. The Arizona Republic.
  • Governor Wesley Bolin, 1978
    Swanson, J. (1978, March 6). Wesley Bolin Lies in State at Capitol Today. The Arizona Republic.
  • Mine Inspector Verne C. McCutchan, 1978
    (1978, August 22). Arizona mine inspector dies after illness. The Arizona Republic.
  • Jesse Owens, 1980
    Sowers, C. (1980, April 3). Hundreds Pay Respects to Jesse Owens. The Arizona Republic.
  • Chief Justice Jesse Udall, 1980
    Richards, J. M. Jesse A. Udall: Republican in House from Graham County –Tenth and Eleventh Legislatures of Arizona. Compiled for the Arizona Legislative Council.
  • Governor Ernest W. McFarland, 1984
    (1984, June 9). Death takes Ernest W. McFarland, former governor, legislator, jurist. The Arizona Republic.
  • State Senator Marilyn Jarrett, 2006
    (2006, March 16). Marilyn Jarrett. The Arizona Republic.
  • Senator John S. McCain III, 2018
    Hansen, R. (2018, August 29). John McCain remembered at state Capitol ceremony: ‘We can be proud he was our senator.’ AZCentral.com
  • Representative Ed Pastor, 2018
    Coppola, C. & Burkitt, B.  (2018, November 30). Former Congressman Ed Pastor to lie in state at Arizona Capitol on Sunday AZCentral.com

 

Researching property history in Arizona, Part 5: Flood Control District Aerial Photos

What was in a vacant lot, in the time before it became vacant? Was there ever anything there? Photographs freeze time, helping researchers to see what a house or landscape looked like in the past. Google Earth shows current aerial views, but for historical aerial photos across the decades, consult the Maricopa County Flood Control District website.

By default, the site shows the most recent available year. Clicking on “Change Aerial” on the right side of the screen opens up a small menu to the left of the screen, with choices of “View a Single Year Aerial”, “Compare 2 Years of Aerials” and “View Oblique Aerial”.

Comparing two years divides the screen with a slider, showing decades of change with a drag of the mouse. The “View Oblique Aerial” option is only for 1930 and shows the map with associated oblique photos and instructions on how to view them. Resolution varies yearly, and some years had very limited coverage. Zooming out completely shows total coverage for each year.

Portland St, Phoenix 1930
Portland St, Phoenix 1930

Researchers will likely want to zoom in on a particular mile or half-mile, then note changes for each photo set. For instance, the area in the Simm’s Addition subdivision, part of which now contains Hance Park, shows change each decade. 1930 shows a row of houses south of Culver, with larger, wooded lots north of Westmoreland. By 1959 some of the lots have emptied, with nearly no houses by 1979.

Portland St, Phoenix 1979
Portland St, Phoenix 1979

The 1986 image shows something like a large quarry, but what was Westmoreland Park is still there. 1991 shows the beginning of the current park, but large blank patches and signs of construction remain. The green lines of what would become I-10 are overlaid throughout, and these photos show how, over the decades, land was cleared along its path.

4. Portland 1986
Portland St, Phoenix 1986
Portland 2013
Portland St, Phoenix 2013

For historians studying development in Phoenix, quick access to these photos proves an invaluable resource.  They can witness neighborhoods expand and contract, or just find out if a house had a pool—or was simply a vacant lot.

Researching Arizona’s place names

place names 3Questions regarding colorful Arizona place names often take place on the highways, where exit signs point to places like “Bloody Basin Road.” If curiosity survives the miles, where can someone look up how these places get named?

There are two standard works for such research: Arizona Place Names by Will C. Barnes and Arizona’s Names: X Marks the Place by Byrd Howell Granger, and both have a place in the State Research Library’s ready reference collection due to frequent use. The library’s copy of original edition of Barnes’ book is heavily annotated and the first few pages are falling apart.

The two books have an intertwined history: Arizona Historian Will C. Barnes’ book was first printed in 1935. Granger revised Barnes’ book for the University of Arizona Press in 1960. Granger published her own book in 1983, and the current edition of Arizona Place Names was published in 1988, and remains in print.
place names 2
The bibliography for the current Barnes book is two pages. Granger’s book contains nine pages of cited publications and three pages of persons interviewed for oral history. Granger explains “Where a family name is cited, the reference is to information learned during visits with “old timers” or those knowing local history. During the early years of research, the oral sources were most important, for the true pioneers were increasingly being silenced by time.”
Both Barnes and Granger give the location of the place name. Sometimes more than one place in Arizona has the same name!

So to answer the question of Bloody Basin, according to Barnes, it is “Said to have been so called because of the many battles with Indians that took place in this region.” (Barnes,54). Granger repeats this, but also adds that “Fred Henry and four other prospectors were attacked here by Apaches in May 1864 and all were wounded. Henry went for help despite having been wounded in both legs.” She also notes the story of a bridge over a gorge where Bloody Basin is: “During one of these crossings, the suspension bridge collapsed and the sheep fell to a bloody death in the “basin” below.” (Granger, 76).

Join us for an upcoming event!

February 22, 2017 – ReferenceUSA Workshop

referenceusa_feb_22_2017

 

Learn to use ReferenceUSA!

Get fast and easy access to details on more than 42 million U.S. businesses and more than 260 million U.S. residents. Information includes; company name, address, phone, executive contact names, employee size, SIC and NAICS codes, credit ratings, etc…..

Use ReferenceUSA to:

  • Conduct market research
  • Build a business plan
  • Locate Sales leads and download lists
  • Locate companies for employment opportunities
    And much more…..

Presented by Kam Draper.

Date: Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Time: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Location: State Library of Arizona, Con Cronin Commons (formerly 3rd Floor Training Area) 1700 W. Washington St. (State Capitol), Phoenix, AZ 85007

 

Join us to Learn the Basics of Westlaw!

westlaw-flyer-jv

Join us to learn the basics of using Westlaw!

Are you new to legal research? Want to learn to use one of the most common legal research databases?

  • Research and retrieve case law and statutes
  • Find annotations for statutes
  • Find out if a case or law has been changed or overruled

Date: Wednesday, February 15, 2017
Time: 12 Noon – 1p.m.

https://www.azlibrary.gov/events/2182