We’re Having an FDLP Anniversary!

On December 19th, 1963, Senators Carl Hayden and Barry Goldwater designated the State of Arizona Research Library as a regional Federal Depository Library for the state of Arizona.

A Federal Depository Library is a library that has agreed to make U.S. government information available to the public. There are more than 1100 of these libraries that make up a national network, and 11 of them are in Arizona. This map will show you the location of all of the Federal Depositories in the United States, including the ones right here in Arizona.

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What kinds of things count as “government information”?

We collect federal agency publications from more than 100 agencies across all three branches of government. You can find everything from Supreme Court opinions to Congressional hearings to topographic maps of the White Mountains here at the library. Whenever the Census Bureau releases new data, or NASA publishes a new study of Mars, these materials join nearly 200 years of history in our Federal Documents Collection.

Our collection is made up of many formats. Most of our items are in print, which includes books, newsletters, pamphlets, and Braille books. We also have maps, microfiche and microfilm, CDs and DVDs, kits, posters, calendars, and even puzzles!

Libraries in the United States have been collecting government information and making it available to Americans for almost as long as the country has existed. In 1813, Congress began distributing official publications to libraries, and in 1895 formally established the Federal Depository Library Program or FDLP. Thus libraries all over the nation were called to action to ensure the people could learn about their government.

The Territorial Library of Arizona was established in 1864 in Prescott, the Territorial Capitol at the time. The earliest library catalog we have is from 1865. This excerpt from the handwritten list of books in the library shows that we were collecting federal publications at least that early – the Territorial Library included the full Eighth U.S. Census, Smithsonian Institution publications, and reports of the Department of Agriculture, Indian Bureau, and Land Office:

S.T.A.R.L. Library catalog from 1865

In 1962, a major change was made to the Federal Depository Library Program. With the Depository Library Act of 1962, up to two libraries in each state could be designated as Regional Depository Libraries. These libraries would be responsible for maintaining complete collections of government publications, and providing services to the other depository libraries in their state, with the goal of ensuring that everyone in their state was able to access government information easily. In 1963, both the Arizona Department of Library and Archives (later to become the State of Arizona Research Library) and the University of Arizona were jointly designated as regional depository libraries by our two Senators at the time, Carl Hayden and Barry Goldwater.

Hayden-Goldwater designation of the Arizona Department of Library and Archives and U of A library as Regional Depository Libraries- 1963

 

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Publications we received in 1963 include “Effects of drought in the Colorado River Basin,” “Damage to livestock from radioactive fallout in event of nuclear war,” and hearings before the Committee on Un-American Activities.

The University of Arizona library is no longer a regional depository library, but it is still in the FDLP, along with 10 other libraries in Arizona. As the sole remaining Regional, the State of Arizona Research Library serves as a statewide hub for U.S. government information and provides services to the other depository libraries and to the public.

 

Want more information?

Check out this short history of the FDLP: Fulfilling Madison’s Vision – the Federal Depository Library Program.

Coming soon: a timeline of the history of the State of Arizona Research Library as a Federal Depository Library!

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Join Us for an Upcoming Event!

September 14, 2016 – Using Census Data/Tools for Business Planning and Market Analysis: Introducing Census Business Builder

Using Census Data September 14

This hands-on training will provide an introduction to Census Bureau Economic Programs and related Business Concepts, the American Community Survey demographics and the latest Business tool: Census Business Builder.   A new Web application,Census Business Builder: Regional Analyst Edition now available in beta, allows users to build a region from one or more counties and create a report for the entire region and the individual business sectors within the region.  This second edition of Census Business Builder follows the successful launch of Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition, which provides statistics for a single type of business and area on the same demographic and economic characteristics as the new edition.

Who should attend? Small business owners, consultants, Small Business Development Training Centers, financial institutions, micro lending organizations, and any organization that targets small businesses and economic development.

Seating is limited.  Registration is required. Training will be hands on, please bring your laptop.  Wi-Fi access available.  Free parking on site.

About presenter Pauline Nuñez:

Pauline Núñez develops and conducts training programs on U.S. Census Data for state/local government, tribal nations, Congressional Districts, nonprofit, health care, and economic development organizations throughout South Central Texas, the Texas-Mexico borderlands and Arizona. She has over 25 years’ experience in community development micro lending, grant writing, marketing and business development for small businesses and non-profit management.

To register for the 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. session, click here.

To register for the 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. session, click here.

Hearing about executive orders and federal rules in the news?

The National Archives has a website with sources to explain how you can find proposed federal rules and other presidential documents: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/

They also explain the importance of the Federal Register, the “official gazette of the United States Government” and what it is at http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/the-federal-register/

    Published daily, it has:

  • Federal Agency Regulations
  • Proposed Rules and Public Notices
  • Executive Orders
  • Proclamations
  • Other Presidential Documents 

Administrative history buffs can read about the beginning of the Federal Register in March 1936 and its history at http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/the-federal-register/history.pdf .

Just need a Federal Register citation or a past rule in a prior version of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) from the last seventy or so years?   Want a copy of an early presidential executive order?  Call the State Library of Arizona at (602) 926-3870 or email research@azlibrary.gov and we will search our print and online resources to find what you need!

National Poinsettia Day, December 12th !

December 12th was designated National Poinsettia Day by House Resolution 471 of the 107th Congress in 2002. Check out the article on Poinsettias in the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s publication Inventor’s Eye to learn about the history of the Poinsettia plant, and the more than 500 patents issued to the Ecke family that made them what they are today!

See the Inventor’s Eye article here:
http://www.uspto.gov/inventors/independent/eye/201312/Poinsettia.jsp
See the House Resolution recognizing Paul Ecke, Jr.  here:
http://beta.congress.gov/bill/107th/house-resolution/471