Arizona’s Territorial Legislature

Arizona’s Legislature met to debate the issues of the day and pass laws, long before Arizona became a state. The Legislature met in Prescott between 1864 and 1867, and again between 1879 and 1889. In between they met in Tucson, before settling in to Phoenix in 1891 to stay.

We have copies of the enacted laws (“Session Laws”) passed by the Territorial Legislature dating from 1864 until Arizona became a state on February 14, 1912. We were the “Valentine to the Nation”. We also have copies of the Session Laws passed since Statehood, which you can research in print in our Reading Room or browse online on the Arizona Memory Project here.

Session LawsWe think it’s vital to preserve these irreplaceable materials. We keep a print copy that is accessible to users. We also make digital copies of everything we can, and post them online so people can access them from anywhere there is an internet connection. We set aside a good-quality preservation copy of each document. Then we select multiple duplicates whenever possible to use as replacements for the accessible copies. We keep the preservation copies and the duplicate replacement copies in separate climate-controlled spaces to assure that the information in them will not be lost.

These may not be things to curl up on a comfy couch and read. But preserving them is just one of the many things we do here at the State of Arizona Research Library.

If you wish to come see the Session Laws or any other historic or current law material in person, stop by the Polly Rosenbaum Archives and History Building at 1901 W. Madison Street, Phoenix any Monday through Friday (except state holidays).

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Ever wonder about Federal Depository Libraries?

free-gov

This post from Free Government Information might seem a little inside baseball to some, but it does a great job explaining why the Federal Depository Library Program (of which the State Library is a member) is so important to both preserving and accessing information produced by the federal government.

For more background info, check out our Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/StateLibAZ/timeline?ref=page_internal

To read the article:

http://freegovinfo.info/node/11549

Arizona Territorial Census Records Now Available Online!

A significant group of valuable Arizona historical record collections, provided through a partnership with the Arizona State Archives and Ancestry.com, are now available on-line and free to residents of the State of Arizona through Ancestry.com.  This includes the Arizona territorial census records covering the years from 1864 through 1882.

All Arizona records are available at azlibrary.gov and can be found on the Doing Research at the Archives page or directly at https://www.azlibrary.gov/arm/research-archives/archives-resources/ancestry-arizona.

This access requires a free Ancestry.com Arizona account. To set up your account you simply go to the web page and enter your five digit Arizona zip code in the space at the bottom of the page.  Once your account is established researchers gain unlimited access to Arizona records that are a part of the State Archives of Arizona’s extensive holdings.

Arizona General Election Canvass

Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan issued the official canvass of results for the 2016 General Election.

Secretary Reagan reported 2.6 million Arizonans voted in the general election, making it the highest number of ballots cast in state history.  While there were a historic number of votes, turnout was about average at 74% ranking 6th highest in Arizona history.

1.       1980       –    80.1%        Reagan – Carter
2.       2008       –    77.7%        Obama – McCain
3.       1992       –    77.2%        Clinton – Bush
4.       2004       –    77.1%        Bush – Kerry
5.       2012       –    74.4%        Obama – Romney
6.       2016       –    74.2%        Trump – Clinton

Demographically, women made up 55% of Arizona’s electorate while 18-24 year olds made up 6%.  The average age of the Arizona voter is 55.

For more, visit: https://www.azsos.gov/about-office/media-center/press-releases/1150

To see past election canvasses, check out the Arizona State Government Publications Collection on the Arizona Memory Project:

http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/cdm/ref/collection/statepubs/id/13234

Who invents voting machines?

votingmachinepatentWe often hear about some interesting inventions here at the State Library’s Patent and Trademark Resource Center, but every now and then we are reminded that something we take for granted like voting machines indeed have to be invented and can be the subject of patents. For more voting related patents, check out the latest issue of the Inventor’s Eye, from the USPTO.

https://www.uspto.gov/learning-and-resources/newsletter/inventors-eye/election-year-patents-rocked-vote

 

Veterans in AZ: Telling Their Story With Census Data

The U.S. Census Bureau collects demographic, social, and economic data on veterans.  Such data includes unemployment rate, household income, business ownership, period of service, educational attainment, health care and age distribution. The data is used for policy analysis, program planning, and budgeting of veteran programs.

As we celebrate those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces this Veterans Day, come learn about this important part of Arizona’s citizenry. This is a hands-on training; participants will be on-line with the Instructor following along with their own computer/laptop to learn how to navigate the census website and access Veteran’s data.

Presented by Pauline Nunez, U.S. Census Bureau

Date: Tuesday November 1, 2016

Time: 9:00 a.m.

Location: Webinar

To Register for this webinar: https://census.webex.com/census/k2/j.php?MTID=t7d8b03c3faebaccae1992708856adf86